World War II Temporary Buildings

Title

World War II Temporary Buildings

Description

These buildings were erected by the federal government during World War II to create offices for the many workers who came for new, war-related jobs. The buildings were never meant to be permanent, and were referred to by locals as "tempos." Temporary housing was constructed in front of the National Gallery of Art and on the grounds of the Washington Monument. There was a group of office buildings where the National Museum of American History is today, as well as by the Reflecting Pool. Some of these buildings remained until the 1970s.

Source

U.S. Naval Historical Center. View original.

Date

1941 (built)
1971 (last removed)

Coverage

Physical Description

Temporary office buildings were constructed by the federal government on the north and south sides of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool, on "Reservation B" where the National Museum of American History is today, and on land today occupied by the National Gallery of Art.

Description

These buildings were erected by the federal government during World War II to create offices for the many workers who came for new, war-related jobs. The buildings were never meant to be permanent, and were referred to by locals as "tempos." Temporary housing was constructed in front of the National Gallery of Art and on the grounds of the Washington Monument. There was a group of office buildings where the National Museum of American History is today, as well as by the Reflecting Pool. Some of these buildings remained until the 1970s.

Date

1941 (built)

Coverage

1920-1949

Source

U.S. Naval Historical Center. View original.