Japanese Lantern

Title

Japanese Lantern

Description

The lantern was given to the people of the United States by the Governor of Tokyo in 1954 to mark the 100th anniversary of Commodore Matthew Perry's arrival in Japan and the opening of trade between the two countries. It was installed amid the first cherry trees planted along the Tidal Basin. The lantern is lighted during the annual Cherry Blossom Festival. It is one of two lanterns created in 1651 to mark the death of a warlord named Tokugama Iemitsu. Both lanterns were formerly located at a temple in Tokyo's Ueno Park, where the twin remains today.

Source

Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. View Original.

Date

03/30/1954 (dedicated)
1651 (sculpted)

Coverage

Physical Description

Granite sculpture approx. H. 10 ft. Diam 2 ft.; Base: approx. H. 5 ft.

Location

Formerly located in Ueno Park, Japan, the sculpture now sits along the Tidal Basin.

Description

The lantern was given to the people of the United States by the Governor of Tokyo in 1954 to mark the 100th anniversary of Commodore Matthew Perry's arrival in Japan and the opening of trade between the two countries. It was installed amid the first cherry trees planted along the Tidal Basin. The lantern is lighted during the annual Cherry Blossom Festival. It is one of two lanterns created in 1651 to mark the death of a warlord named Tokugama Iemitsu. Both lanterns were formerly located at a temple in Tokyo's Ueno Park, where the twin remains today.

Date

03/30/1954 (dedicated)

Coverage

1950-1979

Source

Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. View Original.