Presidential Inauguration

Title

Presidential Inauguration

Description

James Monroe was the first president to take the oath of office outdoors after the government moved to Washington. Previous inaugurations were held indoors, which limited the number of people who could attend. The inauguration was originally going to be held indoors, but members of the Senate and the House of Representatives could not agree on details such as what chairs to use. As this newspaper article mentions, a temporary portico was erected for the ceremony. Because the ceremony was outdoors, many more people were able to attend the inauguration than in previous years.

Source

Washington City Weekly Gazette

Date

03/08/1817

Coverage

Text

Presidential Inauguration

Tuesday the 4th inst. being the day fixed for the installation of president and vice-president of the United States, to serve for the ensuing term of four years, there ceremony took place on the Capitol Hill, in the presence of a great concourse of citizens and strangers, amongst whom were some of the most distinguished characters of the Union. His Excellency James Madison, late chief magistrate, was present on the occasion. The oath was administered to his excellency James Monroe, by chief justice Marshall, at the temporary portico in front of the hall; the vice-president, his excellency Daniel D. Tompkins, having been previously sworn, in the Senate Chamber of the United States. The speeches of both, on this occasion, follow at full length. 

The marine corps, and many of the volunteers of the District, paraded on the spot; salutes of artillery were fired on the hill, at the Navy Yard, and at Fort Warburton. A number of persons in carriages and on horseback, attended the president from his house to the capitol, and, after the ceremonies, paid their respects to him on entering office, as well as to Mr. Madison on his retiring from office. 

This general holyday was concluded by a brilliant ball at Davis' Hotel, in honor of the inauguration, at which it is supposed near one thousand persons attended, amongst whom were their excellencies Monroe, Tompkins, and Madison, the heads of departments, foreign ministers, &c. Mrs. Monroe, Mrs. Madison, and many other ladies of distinction, graced the assembly with their presence. 

Original Format

Newspaper

Description

James Monroe was the first president to take the oath of office outdoors after the government moved to Washington. Previous inaugurations were held indoors, which limited the number of people who could attend. The inauguration was originally going to be held indoors, but members of the Senate and the House of Representatives could not agree on details such as what chairs to use. As this newspaper article mentions, a temporary portico was erected for the ceremony. Because the ceremony was outdoors, many more people were able to attend the inauguration than in previous years.

Date

03/08/1817

Coverage

1800-1829

Source

Washington City Weekly Gazette