Daguerre Memorial

Title

Daguerre Memorial

Description

This memorial commemorates photography pioneer, Louis Daguerre, inventor of the daguerreotype. The Photographer's Association of America presented the memorial to the people of the United States in a ceremony at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building on April 15, 1890, where it was installed in an alcove. In 1897, it was moved outside to the Smithsonian Grounds so visitors could see the whole piece. The statue was removed from the Mall in 1969 to make way for the Hirshhorn Museum. Today, it stands on the grounds of the National Portrait Gallery.

Source

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. View original.

Date

1890 (dedicated)
1897 (moved outdoors)
1969 (removed)

Coverage

Physical Description

A relief bust of Daguerre sits in front of a large globe, admired by a female figure representing Fame. Laurel garlands frame Daguerre and encircle the globe. The inscriptions read: "Photograph, the electric telegraph, and the steam engine are the three greatest discoveries of the age. No five centuries in human progress can show such strides as these." and "To commemorate the first half-century in photograph 1839-1889. Erected by the Photographer's Association of America, August, 1890."

Description

This memorial commemorates photography pioneer, Louis Daguerre, inventor of the daguerreotype. The Photographer's Association of America presented the memorial to the people of the United States in a ceremony at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building on April 15, 1890, where it was installed in an alcove. In 1897, it was moved outside to the Smithsonian Grounds so visitors could see the whole piece. The statue was removed from the Mall in 1969 to make way for the Hirshhorn Museum. Today, it stands on the grounds of the National Portrait Gallery.

Creator

J. Scott Hartley

Date

1890 (dedicated)

Coverage

1890-1919

Source

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. View original.