Braddock's Rock

Title

Braddock's Rock

Description

Originally, Braddock's Rock was a sizable outcropping of Piedmont stone jutting into the Potomac. Called the "Key of all Keys," this rock became a starting point for surveyors drawing property lines for early settlers. In 1755, General Edward Braddock landed at the rocky promontory and began his march to Fort Duquesne with the young George Washington among his soldiers. Later used as a quarry for the stone used in the White House, Capitol, and C&O Canal, it was blasted away in 1832. Today, the remaining portions are 16 feet underground, enclosed by a well located among the approaches to the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge.

Source

The Washington Times, February 19, 1906. View original.

Date

1755 (re-named)
1832 (destroyed)

Coverage

Physical Description

Braddock's Rock is located 16 feet below the surface at the bottom of a granite well. The well can be found on the west side of Route 50 across from the Institute of Peace.

Type

Description

Originally, Braddock's Rock was a sizable outcropping of Piedmont stone jutting into the Potomac. Called the "Key of all Keys," this rock became a starting point for surveyors drawing property lines for early settlers. In 1755, General Edward Braddock landed at the rocky promontory and began his march to Fort Duquesne with the young George Washington among his soldiers. Later used as a quarry for the stone used in the White House, Capitol, and C&O Canal, it was blasted away in 1832. Today, the remaining portions are 16 feet underground, enclosed by a well located among the approaches to the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge.

Date

1755 (re-named)

Coverage

Pre-1800s

Source

The Washington Times, February 19, 1906. View original.